Any area that the pup has access to must be kept clear and clean. Put out of puppy's reach anything you don't want him to chew or destroy. Do not allow your puppy to have unsupervised access to 'unchewables.' Do not chase the puppy in an attempt to take something away. Instead provide puppy with her own toys and teach her how to play with them exclusively.
This will give your new pup a good foundation for basic obedience! Also, during the training, Off Leash K9 can teach you how to house train your dog in order for it to quit having accidents in the house! Additionally, Off Leash K9 will train it to let you know when it has to go outside! During these sessions, Off Leash K9 also answer any questions you have regarding your new pup or its’ training.
“He’s soiling his crate!” Dr. Burch says dogs who come from pet stores, shelters, or other situations where they have been confined for long periods and have had no other choice but to eliminate in their kennels will often soil their crates. The best approach would be to go back to square one with crate and house training. Here are the steps to follow:
Scolding a puppy for soiling your rug, especially after the fact, isn’t going to do anything except make her think you’re a nut. Likewise, some old methods of punishment, like rubbing a dog’s nose in her poop, are so bizarre that it’s hard to imagine how they came to be and if they ever worked for anyone. On the other hand, praising a puppy for doing the right thing works best for everything you will do in your life together. Make her think that she is a little canine Einstein every time she performs this simple, natural act. Be effusive in your praise—cheer, clap, throw cookies. Let her know that no other accomplishment, ever—not going to the moon, not splitting the atom, not inventing coffee—has been as important as this pee. Reward your pup with one of his favorite Purina® Pro Plan® treats. Make sure they’re nice and small, easy for your puppy to digest. https://freedomservicedogs.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/DSF2926-min-768x1152.jpg

Training should be a pleasure for both you and your dog. Granted, there are often challenges as you work towards better manners but if you find yourself becoming frequently frustrated with your dog, it’s time to get help. Frustration is only a few degrees away from anger and you probably won’t be able to make progress trying to train your dog when you’re feeling upset.
This is a very popular program and is usually booked for a few months in advance, so please contact us before paying online or trying to schedule an appointment for this. This is where you drop off your dog, and 2-weeks later you pick up a dog that is flawless outside, off-leash, with distractions! See our youtube channel for numerous board and train before/after videos!
This article was co-authored by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS. Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS is a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice. She graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1987 with a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. She has worked at the same animal clinic in her hometown for over 20 years.
When she feels an urge, the puppy will usually let you know by whining and scratching. That’s her signal that she has to go and wants out of her little den. Now! Don’t delay because if you let your pup lose control in her crate, she’ll get the idea that it’s OK to mess up her living space. Then she’ll think nothing of leaving little packages around where you live, too.
Unless you plan to keep your dog outdoors--and few of us do because it's not recommended--you'll need to teach your dog where to eliminate. Therefore, house training (also called housebreaking or potty training) is one of the first things you need to work on with your dog. Crate training can be a very helpful part of the training process. This includes house training as well as many other areas of training:
Often, the sit command will be one of the easiest for your dog to learn first. Next, you can train your dog to lie down. At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay. In addition, your dog should be trained to come when called as soon as possible. This is one of the most important fundamental commands. Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands. 

Note the breed of your dog. Larger dogs tend to be easier to house train than toy dogs. Smaller dogs need to go more frequently (with tinier digestive systems).[4] Smaller dogs can also get into places to eliminate where you may not notice or be able to find until a bad habit has been established. Limit your dog’s access to the whole house to prevent this. 

Choose a designated area for your puppy to "go" before bringing him home. This spot might be somewhere in the backyard, next to a structure that provides shelter from wind, or some other suitable place in the garden. Wherever it is, have a firm commitment to it before getting the puppy. You don't want to create inconsistent messages by shifting his toilet around the yard while you make up your mind.[10]
There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion. http://www.adventureswithrover.com/uploads/4/5/1/5/45153749/1884289_orig.jpg?318
Training should be a pleasure for both you and your dog. Granted, there are often challenges as you work towards better manners but if you find yourself becoming frequently frustrated with your dog, it’s time to get help. Frustration is only a few degrees away from anger and you probably won’t be able to make progress trying to train your dog when you’re feeling upset.
“My lapdog is piddling all over the house!” This is common among people who own toy dogs. Some trainers recommend teaching little dogs to use indoor potty spots, in much the same way as a cat uses a litter box. In addition to piddle pads, there are actual potty boxes for indoor use. Other trainers say that with consistency, you can house train a little dog. It just may take a little additional time, attention, and effort. https://doglab.com/wp-content/uploads/Australian-shepherd-staring-at-dog-treats-while-being-clicker-trained.jpg
Develop a feeding schedule. Putting your puppy on a feeding schedule can make your efforts much more successful. A puppy allowed to eat whenever he wants will make house training difficult. Also, developing a schedule to take your puppy outside will make it easier on you. Always take a puppy outside within 15 to 20 minutes after meals like clockwork. http://www.overtherainbowdogs.com/Upload/PhotosApr2011/DSC02488800.jpg
Teaching your new puppy to potty at the right time and place is one of the most important first steps you can take for a long, happy life together. House soiling is among the top reasons why dogs lose their homes or end up in shelters. Few people are willing to put up with a dog who destroys rugs and flooring, or who leaves a stinky mess that you have to clean after a hard day at work.
Positive reinforcement is the key to success. A common mistake is to punish your dog during training or become angry. This will only cause confusion. You can try to hold your dog's attention with treats and enthusiasm, but know that it is time to end a session when your dog becomes bored or tired. Try to end sessions on a positive note. Eventually, successful training will be achieved with patience and consistency.

A good guide is that dogs can control their bladders for the number of hours corresponding to their age in months up to about nine months to a year. (Remember, though, that 10 to 12 hours is a long time for anyone to hold it!) A 6-month-old pup can reasonably be expected to hold it for about 6 hours. Never forget that all puppies are individuals and the timing will differ for each.
Any area that the pup has access to must be kept clear and clean. Put out of puppy's reach anything you don't want him to chew or destroy. Do not allow your puppy to have unsupervised access to 'unchewables.' Do not chase the puppy in an attempt to take something away. Instead provide puppy with her own toys and teach her how to play with them exclusively. https://www.labradortraininghq.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/The-best-dog-treats-for-training-2.jpg
This article was co-authored by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS. Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS is a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice. She graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1987 with a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. She has worked at the same animal clinic in her hometown for over 20 years.
The Papillon Club of America explains these dogs are “happy, alert, and friendly,” but you need to be a consistent trainer to bring out the best in your dog. “Consistent, dedicated trainers delight in the aptitude this breed has for just about anything. But this is a breed that learns from every single experience, and an inconsistent trainer will not produce consistent results — even with very basic skills like housebreaking.”
Clicker training, a common form of positive reinforcement, is a simple and effective dog training method. Although it is still fine to train your dog without clicker training, many people find it helpful. With clicker training, you can easily and effectively teach your dog all kinds of basic and advanced commands and tricks. It's fast and easy to learn how to clicker train your dog
Teaching your new puppy to potty at the right time and place is one of the most important first steps you can take for a long, happy life together. House soiling is among the top reasons why dogs lose their homes or end up in shelters. Few people are willing to put up with a dog who destroys rugs and flooring, or who leaves a stinky mess that you have to clean after a hard day at work. http://www.pawschicago.org/fileadmin/_processed_/csm_Web_Training_Promo_Header-01_0ab6b20bfa.png
You can start your puppy off on the right paw by teaching good manners from the moment you bring him home. Every interaction that you have with your puppy is a learning opportunity, and with gentle guidance, you can help him understand important lessons like how to greet new friends without jumping up, how to wait quietly for dinner and what to do with those puppy teeth. 
Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.
Dog training has changed a great deal in the past 25 years, and we now know much more about how dogs learn and the most effective ways to motivate them. While dog training in the past relied on being the “alpha” in the relationship and required equipment like correction collars (or choke collars), behavioral science proves that it’s much more effective to use positive reinforcement training, where training is a team activity with both parties working together to achieve goals.
Remember that training is an ongoing process. You will never be completely finished. It is important to keep working on obedience training throughout the life of your dog. People who learn a language at a young age but stop speaking that language may forget much of it as they grow older. The same goes for your dog: use it or lose it. Running through even the most basic tricks and commands will help them stay fresh in your dog's mind. Plus, it's a great way to spend time with your dog.
Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate.
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