Let your new dog gradually earn freedom throughout your home. A common error that many pet parents make is giving their new dog too much freedom too soon. This can easily lead to accidents relating to housetraining and destructive chewing. So, close off doors to unoccupied rooms and use baby gates to section off parts of the house, if necessary. One of the best ways to minimize incidents is to keep your dog tethered to you in the house and by using a crate or doggie safe area when you can’t actively supervise him.
Dog training has changed a great deal in the past 25 years, and we now know much more about how dogs learn and the most effective ways to motivate them. While dog training in the past relied on being the “alpha” in the relationship and required equipment like correction collars (or choke collars), behavioral science proves that it’s much more effective to use positive reinforcement training, where training is a team activity with both parties working together to achieve goals. https://clickpawsitivedogtraining.com/files/2014/04/ft1.jpg

Keep your training sessions short, consistent and always have fun. The key to shaping your puppy's behavior is to start out with very easy commands, continue to build on these successes and apply heaps of repetition. Base your puppy training sessions around trust and mutual respect rather than old school methods based on punishment, avoidance and harsh corrections. In this environment you will find that your puppy loves his training sessions and his confidence will grow with each and every session. https://www.mypetconnections.org/uploads/1/0/8/9/108993899/connecting-with-your-pet-workshop-series-july_orig.png

Dog training has changed a great deal in the past 25 years, and we now know much more about how dogs learn and the most effective ways to motivate them. While dog training in the past relied on being the “alpha” in the relationship and required equipment like correction collars (or choke collars), behavioral science proves that it’s much more effective to use positive reinforcement training, where training is a team activity with both parties working together to achieve goals.
Teaching your new puppy to potty at the right time and place is one of the most important first steps you can take for a long, happy life together. House soiling is among the top reasons why dogs lose their homes or end up in shelters. Few people are willing to put up with a dog who destroys rugs and flooring, or who leaves a stinky mess that you have to clean after a hard day at work. https://www.schoolforthedogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/4-blue-let-us-work-slider.jpg
Develop a potty schedule. The most important thing of all when house training a puppy (or dog) is consistency. If you are consistent, and do the same thing and expect the same action every single time, your puppy will catch on very quickly. On the other hand, changing your actions and expectations will confuse your puppy. Create a predictable and consistent routine for your puppy.[4] Take your puppy out:[11]
Size the crate appropriately. Size the crate so the puppy can stand up, turn around, and lie down. It should not be so big that the puppy can eliminate in one corner and sleep in another. The idea is to use the natural instinct to avoid sleeping in your own mess to help with the housebreaking process. If you have a large breed puppy, there are crates designed to “grow” with your puppy, so you don’t have to waste money buying bigger sizes as they age. If you don’t have a crate, you can use a section of your bathroom partitioned with a baby gate.[9]
Your dog must finish our Basic Obedience Package before we will teach them advanced lessons! We offer numerous advanced lessons! Some are: extended distance obedience (your dog will be sitting/downing on command from 50+ yards away from you), heel command (they come running, go around you and sit down right beside your left leg), watch command (stare at you until you release them), through command (go in between your legs and sit down), stand command (they will assume a standing position on command), front command (they will come running and sit directly in front of you no matter where they are), focused heeling (will stare at you the entire time they heel), touch command (they will run up and stand up against anything you point to), and many more!
If you’re an experienced dog owner and simply want a dog who will take to training well, you might want to consider a border collie. The border collie has tons of energy but wants to please you. The AKC advises, “The uncanny intelligence, athleticism, and trainability of border collies have a perfect outlet in agility work.” Translation? This workaholic dog will never be a couch potato. So you’ll need to expend some of your own energy keeping him busy. https://www.k9ofmine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/best-free-online-dog-training-videos-e1423165813419-1150x700.jpg
Once you’ve taken some classes and your dog has mastered the necessary skills, you might decide to compete. There are three main levels of progression in competition: Novice, Open and Utility; with other steps in between to help build on the required skills. Find an event near you and then submit an official AKC entry form to the trial secretary or superintendent in charge of accepting the entries for the trial.
Some dogs are slower to pick up house training than others. The important thing is to be consistent in her training. Re-read this guide and then check back with what you're doing. Has anything slipped, such as you don't stay outside with her or she goes too long between comfort breaks? Remember the golden rules which are to be there to praise her when she goes in the right spot and minimize the risk of accidents indoors
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