There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion.

Feed your dog a high-quality diet with appropriate amounts of protein. If your dog spends most of his days lounging in your condo, don’t feed him food with a protein level that is ideal for dogs who herd sheep all day. The money that you will spend on feeding an appropriate quality food will often be money that you save in vet bills later on. I recommend you always check with your veterinarian for the right diet for your dog.
The Rottweiler takes easily to training, but he definitely needs a job to keep him happy. According to the AKC, this dog’s “intelligence, endurance and willingness to work make him suitable as a police dog, herder, service dog, therapy dog, obedience competitor and devoted companion.” You’ll need to train him on basic obedience commands, as well as social skills. And you’ll also have to harness his natural territorial instincts. As the AKC puts it, “He has to know that you’re in charge, even if he is twice your size.”
The miniature schnauzer finds it easy to learn new commands. But you’ll definitely to work to keep this high-energy dog occupied. And you’ll have to train him not to bark excessively. Fortunately, the AKC explains, “This breed craves human companionship, which, combined with the breed’s intelligence, makes him easy to train for all kinds of activities. He is alert and spunky, but also obedient to commands.” https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1362/5949/articles/feature-image_023d5955-8237-4696-aa0e-0b2bb61d153e_1000x.jpg?v
Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.  

Develop a feeding schedule. Putting your puppy on a feeding schedule can make your efforts much more successful. A puppy allowed to eat whenever he wants will make house training difficult. Also, developing a schedule to take your puppy outside will make it easier on you. Always take a puppy outside within 15 to 20 minutes after meals like clockwork.
Once you’ve taken some classes and your dog has mastered the necessary skills, you might decide to compete. There are three main levels of progression in competition: Novice, Open and Utility; with other steps in between to help build on the required skills. Find an event near you and then submit an official AKC entry form to the trial secretary or superintendent in charge of accepting the entries for the trial.
Owning a dog comes with a lot of responsibility. Dogs need a safe environment and a nutritious diet. They need veterinary care. Plus, they need exercise, attention, and plenty of training. It’s no wonder that in addition to searching for a dog who’s easy to own, many people want a dog who will easily learn new tricks (or learn to relieve himself outside). http://itsadogslifeny.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Clicker-training-dog-resource.jpg
Some dogs are slower to pick up house training than others. The important thing is to be consistent in her training. Re-read this guide and then check back with what you're doing. Has anything slipped, such as you don't stay outside with her or she goes too long between comfort breaks? Remember the golden rules which are to be there to praise her when she goes in the right spot and minimize the risk of accidents indoors
You may also notice common behavior problems in your dog such as jumping up, barking, or even aggression. The best way to correct any misbehavior is to interrupt it. Shift your dog's attention to something positive. Try running through cues that your dog has mastered followed by rewards. Keep your demeanor cool and confident, and be clear about what you mean.

Located in Van Buren, Arkansas, SMART DOGS is the creation of owner Mary A. Gilbreth, Ph.D., Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) and Certified Holistic Life & Stress Management Coach (CHLC).  Committed to education & excellence, Mary was the first trainer in the state of Arkansas to earn a CPDT and  has continued to bring numerous other firsts to the people & dogs of AR.  In addition to sharing her own knowledge & skills, Mary has hosted several  internationally known trainers  – Kathy Cascade (TTouch), Theresa McKeon (TAGteach International), and Kay Laurence (Learning About Dogs).  A Specialist in preventing & modifying aggressive and fearful behavior, Mary is well-versed in canine and human behavior, relationships, training, wellness & nutrition.  Mary is an avid clicker and positive reinforcement trainer and teaches a wide range of topics, activities & Dog Sports to her students  and also the Plumwood Posse – her dogs and cat.  To date, Mary & her dogs hold titles in Agility, Freestyle Tricks, Obedience, Rally & Triebball and certifications in Canine Good Citizen and Therapy Dog. Through education, behavior change and a whole lot of fun, Mary promotes better behavior at *both* ends of the leash.


That can vary considerably, says Dr. Burch. There are many factors to consider, such as age, learning history, and your methods and consistency. An 8-week-old puppy is very different developmentally than a 5-month-old puppy. Some puppies have perfect manners after just a few days. Others can take months, especially if the dog has had a less than ideal situation before coming to you. With patience and persistence, though, most dogs can learn.
The Brussels griffon consistently ranks as one of the easiest dogs to train. As the AKC notes, they are “social, friendly, and easily trained and will usually get along well with other family pets and well-behaved children.” Just bear in mind they’re one of the more high-maintenance dog breeds because they prefer to stay close to their owners and don’t like being left alone.
Unless you plan to keep your dog outdoors--and few of us do because it's not recommended--you'll need to teach your dog where to eliminate. Therefore, house training (also called housebreaking or potty training) is one of the first things you need to work on with your dog. Crate training can be a very helpful part of the training process. This includes house training as well as many other areas of training:
According to the Border Terrier Club of America, the border terrier wants to please you. “This makes it easy to train basic house manners, such as housebreaking, walking on a leash, leaving garbage alone, leaving clothes and kids’ toys alone, not jumping on people or furniture, sitting and staying, and coming when called (barring the presence of a squirrel or rabbit).”
Teaching your new puppy to potty at the right time and place is one of the most important first steps you can take for a long, happy life together. House soiling is among the top reasons why dogs lose their homes or end up in shelters. Few people are willing to put up with a dog who destroys rugs and flooring, or who leaves a stinky mess that you have to clean after a hard day at work. http://www.pawschicago.org/fileadmin/_processed_/csm_Web_Training_Promo_Header-01_0ab6b20bfa.png
Remember that training is an ongoing process. You will never be completely finished. It is important to keep working on obedience training throughout the life of your dog. People who learn a language at a young age but stop speaking that language may forget much of it as they grow older. The same goes for your dog: use it or lose it. Running through even the most basic tricks and commands will help them stay fresh in your dog's mind. Plus, it's a great way to spend time with your dog. https://topdogtips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/The-Best-Dog-Clicker-for-Training.jpg
Let your new dog gradually earn freedom throughout your home. A common error that many pet parents make is giving their new dog too much freedom too soon. This can easily lead to accidents relating to housetraining and destructive chewing. So, close off doors to unoccupied rooms and use baby gates to section off parts of the house, if necessary. One of the best ways to minimize incidents is to keep your dog tethered to you in the house and by using a crate or doggie safe area when you can’t actively supervise him.
At 4-6 months, puppies in this age group can often seem "half" house trained due to their ability to be easily distracted. He's likely to want to explore the world, which means chasing a moth might prevent him from eliminating when you take him to his spot. By now, a puppy of four months can wait about four to five hours before needing to eliminate, while a puppy of six months can go as long as six or seven hours.
×