This package is for those who really want their dog to be rock-stars! This includes 8 lessons for $850.00. You save $75.00 by paying for the Basic Obedience Package and 4 Advanced lessons up-front! The e-collar we use has a two-year warranty, it is completely waterproof, and it has a range of 3/4 mile (1200 yards)! This will be ready at your first lesson along with the 20-foot leash!

Changing behavior takes time. You need to have realistic expectations about changing your dog’s behavior as well as how long it will take to change behaviors that you don’t like. Often behaviors which are “normal” doggie behaviors will take the most time such as barking, digging and jumping. You also need to consider how long your dog has rehearsed the behavior. For example, if you didn’t mind that your dog jumped up on people to say hi for the last seven years and now you decide that you don’t want him to do that anymore, that behavior will take a much longer time to undo than if you had addressed it when he was a pup. Remember it’s never too late to change the behavior some will just take longer than others.
Submissive urination is a normal way for your puppy to demonstrate submissive behavior. Even a dog that is otherwise housetrained may leave dribbles and puddles of urine at your feet when greeting you. Excitement urination with a puppy is usually caused by lack of bladder control. The puppy is not aware that he is urinating; he's just excited and any punishment will only confuse him. https://www.nylabone.com/-/media/Images/Nylabone-NA/US/Dog101/Training-Behaviors/Dog-Training-Hacks-From-the-Pros-jpg.jpg
Understand how your puppy views the environment. Puppies don’t have an inherent understanding of what humans consider right and wrong. They can learn many behaviors, though. A puppy doesn’t understand that it is “bad” behavior to urinate on your carpet. To your puppy, the carpet is an acceptable surface, just like the grass outside. You must teach the puppy the better choice.
The idea of using treats to train is often equated with bribery. Truthfully, dogs do what works. If using treats gets them to do what you want, then why not? You can also use the world around you as a reinforcement. Every interaction you have with your dog is a learning opportunity, so when you think about it, you probably don’t use food very often except during active training sessions. So why does your dog continue to hang out? Because you reinforce him with praise, touch, games and walks. Just remember, the behavior should produce the treat; the treat should not produce the behavior. http://www.tcotc.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Safety_sm-600x675.jpg

The Australian shepherd can learn anything you can teach him. But you need to keep him busy and entertained. In fact, you’ll probably need to continually devise new games and challenges for this highly intelligent dog. As the American Kennel Club explains, this breed’s “strong work drive can make Aussies more dog than a sedentary pet owner might bargain for. Aussies are remarkably intelligent, quite capable of outthinking an unsuspecting novice owner.”
“My lapdog is piddling all over the house!” This is common among people who own toy dogs. Some trainers recommend teaching little dogs to use indoor potty spots, in much the same way as a cat uses a litter box. In addition to piddle pads, there are actual potty boxes for indoor use. Other trainers say that with consistency, you can house train a little dog. It just may take a little additional time, attention, and effort. https://i2.wp.com/bksdogtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Brookside-Pet-web.jpg?fit
Watch for signs. Your puppy may start to understand that he should eliminate outside before he understands how to let you know he needs to go. Watch for telltale signs that a puppy has a full bladder. Look for: barking or scratching at the door through which you take your puppy out, squatting, restlessness, and sniffing around or circling.[12] If you observe one of these behaviors, especially when you haven’t taken your puppy out recently, then it’s probably time for him to go. http://akdogsports.com/uploads/3/4/8/5/34851881/ndf-2371w_orig.jpg
According to the Golden Retriever Club of America, dogs — including golden retrievers — are problem solvers and learn by trial and error. But your golden isn’t the only one who will be learning during the process of training. “As you teach your dog the steps necessary to learn the obedience exercises, he will respond correctly or incorrectly, and you must learn how to respond appropriately,” the club says.
This article was co-authored by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS. Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS is a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice. She graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1987 with a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. She has worked at the same animal clinic in her hometown for over 20 years.
This is a very popular program and is usually booked for a few months in advance, so please contact us before paying online or trying to schedule an appointment for this. This is where you drop off your dog, and 2-weeks later you pick up a dog that is flawless outside, off-leash, with distractions! See our youtube channel for numerous board and train before/after videos!
Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.
This 2-week program is a program which focuses on practical, everyday obedience that is completed with a high level of precision, outside, off-leash, with distractions! This program provides a little bit of everything, including manners and socialization (dogs and people). All behaviors are taught with high-level distraction proofing. This program offers the following: https://wagsandwiggles.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Untitled-design.jpg
Teaching your new puppy to potty at the right time and place is one of the most important first steps you can take for a long, happy life together. House soiling is among the top reasons why dogs lose their homes or end up in shelters. Few people are willing to put up with a dog who destroys rugs and flooring, or who leaves a stinky mess that you have to clean after a hard day at work. https://smartdoguniversity.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/SchoonRen-e1503427432306.jpg

Start by finding an AKC Club near you that offers training classes. Ask if you can observe a class before committing to make sure it’s the right one for you. Learn more about different types of classes here. To get the most benefit, you must plan on practicing at home as well. But don’t worry: Your at-home sessions don’t have to be very time-consuming and practice sessions should be kept short.


Develop a potty schedule. The most important thing of all when house training a puppy (or dog) is consistency. If you are consistent, and do the same thing and expect the same action every single time, your puppy will catch on very quickly. On the other hand, changing your actions and expectations will confuse your puppy. Create a predictable and consistent routine for your puppy.[4] Take your puppy out:[11]


“My lapdog is piddling all over the house!” This is common among people who own toy dogs. Some trainers recommend teaching little dogs to use indoor potty spots, in much the same way as a cat uses a litter box. In addition to piddle pads, there are actual potty boxes for indoor use. Other trainers say that with consistency, you can house train a little dog. It just may take a little additional time, attention, and effort. https://i2.wp.com/bksdogtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Brookside-Pet-web.jpg?fit

Whenever you’re training your dog, it’s important to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone’s on the same page. If you are telling your dog “off” when he jumps on the couch and someone else is saying “down,” while someone else is letting him hang out up there, how on earth is he ever going to learn what you want? Consistency will be the key to your success.


The miniature schnauzer finds it easy to learn new commands. But you’ll definitely to work to keep this high-energy dog occupied. And you’ll have to train him not to bark excessively. Fortunately, the AKC explains, “This breed craves human companionship, which, combined with the breed’s intelligence, makes him easy to train for all kinds of activities. He is alert and spunky, but also obedient to commands.” https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1362/5949/articles/feature-image_023d5955-8237-4696-aa0e-0b2bb61d153e_1000x.jpg?v
Training should be a pleasure for both you and your dog. Granted, there are often challenges as you work towards better manners but if you find yourself becoming frequently frustrated with your dog, it’s time to get help. Frustration is only a few degrees away from anger and you probably won’t be able to make progress trying to train your dog when you’re feeling upset. https://www.servicedogcertifications.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Service-dog-requirements-e1487737521905.png
The Australian shepherd can learn anything you can teach him. But you need to keep him busy and entertained. In fact, you’ll probably need to continually devise new games and challenges for this highly intelligent dog. As the American Kennel Club explains, this breed’s “strong work drive can make Aussies more dog than a sedentary pet owner might bargain for. Aussies are remarkably intelligent, quite capable of outthinking an unsuspecting novice owner.”
Clicker training is a wonderful way to utilize the power of positive reinforcement. The clicker, a small device that makes a precise noise, effectively marks when your dog has performed the correct action that will pay off with a food reward. Once your dog has mastered the behavior, you can wean them off of the clicker and put it away until it’s time to teach something new. Clicker training can be used for everything from teaching the basics like “sit,” “down” and “come” to more complex behavioral modification for challenges like leash aggression. http://smartdoguniversity.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Levibabysnapseed-1024x683.jpg
“He’s soiling his crate!” Dr. Burch says dogs who come from pet stores, shelters, or other situations where they have been confined for long periods and have had no other choice but to eliminate in their kennels will often soil their crates. The best approach would be to go back to square one with crate and house training. Here are the steps to follow:
Clean up any accidents quickly and thoroughly. Hardwood and tile floors should be wiped cleaned and sprayed with a disinfectant. Carpets need to be cleaned with a carpet cleaner. This is probably the most important step because dogs have such a great sense of smell. If they can still smell the urine or feces, they will continue to eliminate in the same spot.[18] This is also why the dog should remain on leash inside the house for many months before allowing free range of the whole house. https://i.pinimg.com/originals/f7/68/0f/f7680ffd09652c81ea4ce96bea48a211.jpg
Develop a potty schedule. The most important thing of all when house training a puppy (or dog) is consistency. If you are consistent, and do the same thing and expect the same action every single time, your puppy will catch on very quickly. On the other hand, changing your actions and expectations will confuse your puppy. Create a predictable and consistent routine for your puppy.[4] Take your puppy out:[11] https://www.petliferadio.com/images9/pic01.jpg
The Labrador retriever takes the cake as the most popular dog in the U.S. — and for good reason. The breed is easy to train, whether you want one as a family dog or working dog. The AKC reports Labs socialize well with humans and with other dogs. But you shouldn’t “confuse his laid-back personality for low energy. The Labrador retriever is extremely active — he’s never met a backyard he didn’t like.” According to the Labrador Retriever Club, these dogs are “eager to please and non-aggressive toward man or animal.”
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