Dr. Burch says the use of puppy pads and paper training can be “tricky because you’re reinforcing two different options for the puppy.” In an ideal situation, pups would learn to hold it indoors and only eliminate at specific spots outdoors. But some cases may require a bit of creative thought, such as a person who has a job that makes it impossible to get home several times a day, or for a tiny dog living where the winters are brutal. Puppy pads give a dog the option of relieving herself in an approved spot at home. After the dog matures, the owner can then work on having the dog do her business outdoors all the time.
That can vary considerably, says Dr. Burch. There are many factors to consider, such as age, learning history, and your methods and consistency. An 8-week-old puppy is very different developmentally than a 5-month-old puppy. Some puppies have perfect manners after just a few days. Others can take months, especially if the dog has had a less than ideal situation before coming to you. With patience and persistence, though, most dogs can learn.
Some dogs are slower to pick up house training than others. The important thing is to be consistent in her training. Re-read this guide and then check back with what you're doing. Has anything slipped, such as you don't stay outside with her or she goes too long between comfort breaks? Remember the golden rules which are to be there to praise her when she goes in the right spot and minimize the risk of accidents indoors
The Brussels griffon consistently ranks as one of the easiest dogs to train. As the AKC notes, they are “social, friendly, and easily trained and will usually get along well with other family pets and well-behaved children.” Just bear in mind they’re one of the more high-maintenance dog breeds because they prefer to stay close to their owners and don’t like being left alone.
Whenever you’re training your dog, it’s important to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone’s on the same page. If you are telling your dog “off” when he jumps on the couch and someone else is saying “down,” while someone else is letting him hang out up there, how on earth is he ever going to learn what you want? Consistency will be the key to your success.

Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.
Scolding a puppy for soiling your rug, especially after the fact, isn’t going to do anything except make her think you’re a nut. Likewise, some old methods of punishment, like rubbing a dog’s nose in her poop, are so bizarre that it’s hard to imagine how they came to be and if they ever worked for anyone. On the other hand, praising a puppy for doing the right thing works best for everything you will do in your life together. Make her think that she is a little canine Einstein every time she performs this simple, natural act. Be effusive in your praise—cheer, clap, throw cookies. Let her know that no other accomplishment, ever—not going to the moon, not splitting the atom, not inventing coffee—has been as important as this pee. Reward your pup with one of his favorite Purina® Pro Plan® treats. Make sure they’re nice and small, easy for your puppy to digest. https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5975726a5016e132ff0521a9/1505326184418-OTUW2AGZTXKPDY75I9WJ/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kDrQ9tfdcvPUv7NgXGP4R2R7gQa3H78H3Y0txjaiv_0fDoOvxcdMmMKkDsyUqMSsMWxHk725yiiHCCLfrh8O1z4YTzHvnKhyp6Da-NYroOW3ZGjoBKy3azqku80C789l0gmXcXvEVFTLbYX9CdVcGe4zwrosjp5YtnrvbmlM1LFKb7wNXE8lRZ0Z8l5PIsW3Vw/Stephanie+Bennett+Dog+Puppy+Training+%7C+Behavior+Modification+Potty+Training+%7C+Houston+TX_FC_7619+resized.jpg?format

Two weeks ago, before meeting with Don, walking Pippi was a bit of a chore, she pulled me along and when an exciting animal or something peaked her attention she worked hard to chase after. But i cannot tell a lie, it was one lesson with Don and walking instantly got easier and more enjoyable. And yesterday Pippi walked without pulling once; when... https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1027/4289/products/puppy-start-right-2400x2400.jpg?v
There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion. http://www.tcotc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/home-bkg1.jpg

Often, the sit command will be one of the easiest for your dog to learn first. Next, you can train your dog to lie down. At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay. In addition, your dog should be trained to come when called as soon as possible. This is one of the most important fundamental commands. Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands.


Finally, it’s okay to admit that you need a cheerleader to support you as your train your dog. A good trainer will help you troubleshoot setbacks, give you a gentle push if you get stuck and most importantly, help you achieve your goals. Having someone hold you accountable is a great way to ensure that you and your dog get all of the training you need! http://www.theclevercaninenw.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/gracie-225x300.jpg
The Rottweiler takes easily to training, but he definitely needs a job to keep him happy. According to the AKC, this dog’s “intelligence, endurance and willingness to work make him suitable as a police dog, herder, service dog, therapy dog, obedience competitor and devoted companion.” You’ll need to train him on basic obedience commands, as well as social skills. And you’ll also have to harness his natural territorial instincts. As the AKC puts it, “He has to know that you’re in charge, even if he is twice your size.” https://dsvf96nw4ftce.cloudfront.net/images/detailed/2/clik-r-dog-clicker.jpg?t
You may also notice common behavior problems in your dog such as jumping up, barking, or even aggression. The best way to correct any misbehavior is to interrupt it. Shift your dog's attention to something positive. Try running through cues that your dog has mastered followed by rewards. Keep your demeanor cool and confident, and be clear about what you mean.

Size the crate appropriately. Size the crate so the puppy can stand up, turn around, and lie down. It should not be so big that the puppy can eliminate in one corner and sleep in another. The idea is to use the natural instinct to avoid sleeping in your own mess to help with the housebreaking process. If you have a large breed puppy, there are crates designed to “grow” with your puppy, so you don’t have to waste money buying bigger sizes as they age. If you don’t have a crate, you can use a section of your bathroom partitioned with a baby gate.[9] https://www.doghealth.com/images/clicker_training_dog_fetch.jpg
Whenever you’re training your dog, it’s important to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone’s on the same page. If you are telling your dog “off” when he jumps on the couch and someone else is saying “down,” while someone else is letting him hang out up there, how on earth is he ever going to learn what you want? Consistency will be the key to your success.
Before you begin dog obedience training, choose the best method for you and your dog. Training styles vary, but most trainers agree that dogs respond best to positive reinforcement, such as praise or treats. One common training variation, known as clicker training, includes the use of conditioned reinforcer. There are plenty of dog training books and websites where you can learn about training techniques and determine which best suits you and your dog. When planning out your training methods, don't forget about socialization.
Dog training has changed a great deal in the past 25 years, and we now know much more about how dogs learn and the most effective ways to motivate them. While dog training in the past relied on being the “alpha” in the relationship and required equipment like correction collars (or choke collars), behavioral science proves that it’s much more effective to use positive reinforcement training, where training is a team activity with both parties working together to achieve goals. https://clickpawsitivedogtraining.com/files/2014/04/ft1.jpg
You should also consider bringing in a professional if your dog exhibits behavior that makes you nervous (like growling or biting), particularly if you have young children in your home. It’s safest to begin behavioral modification with a professional when a dog first starts exhibiting troublesome behaviors rather than waiting for them to take root. As the expression goes, dog rarely grow out of problem behaviors, they grow into them.
Seeking professional help doesn't mean ditching your DIY training program. You can find a professional dog trainer who offers private training sessions, and some trainers even offer online sessions. Many dog owners prefer to join a local dog obedience class so they will be under the supervision of a dog training instructor without the higher cost of private sessions. Plus, classes challenge your dog to learn around the distractions of other dogs.
Your dog must finish our Basic Obedience Package before we will teach them advanced lessons! We offer numerous advanced lessons! Some are: extended distance obedience (your dog will be sitting/downing on command from 50+ yards away from you), heel command (they come running, go around you and sit down right beside your left leg), watch command (stare at you until you release them), through command (go in between your legs and sit down), stand command (they will assume a standing position on command), front command (they will come running and sit directly in front of you no matter where they are), focused heeling (will stare at you the entire time they heel), touch command (they will run up and stand up against anything you point to), and many more! https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/06/12/hsieh_angela_npr_hiddenbrain_clicker1_custom-d27000dbb4b77c0e417db99375b5fb2d072254a8-s800-c85.jpg
When she feels an urge, the puppy will usually let you know by whining and scratching. That’s her signal that she has to go and wants out of her little den. Now! Don’t delay because if you let your pup lose control in her crate, she’ll get the idea that it’s OK to mess up her living space. Then she’ll think nothing of leaving little packages around where you live, too.

Most dogs will learn to associate a specific door with going outside. As a puppy gets older, he will usually go to the door to be let out. Each dog will develop whatever habit gets him let out. For some, this is barking, for others running to the door and back to you, and others will scratch at the door (this should not be encouraged if you don't want to replace the door).
Don't be surprised by “reversions." Your puppy may revert to eliminating inside again after you thought he was trained. This can happen for a number of reasons, such as sexual maturity, change of routine, curiosity overwhelming the need to go at the usual time, etc. Resume the consistent routine you used to housebreak your puppy. He will quickly start obeying the routine again.[19]

Most dogs will learn to associate a specific door with going outside. As a puppy gets older, he will usually go to the door to be let out. Each dog will develop whatever habit gets him let out. For some, this is barking, for others running to the door and back to you, and others will scratch at the door (this should not be encouraged if you don't want to replace the door).
Always remember that you are dealing with a very immature young animal. Be realistic, flexible, patient and always fair during puppy training sessions. Your puppy doesn't just automatically know this stuff! It's all new to him and he is bound to have the odd slip up and mistake along the way. Don't worry about these mistakes, just move on and do your best to prevent them in the future.
Positive reinforcement is the key to success. A common mistake is to punish your dog during training or become angry. This will only cause confusion. You can try to hold your dog's attention with treats and enthusiasm, but know that it is time to end a session when your dog becomes bored or tired. Try to end sessions on a positive note. Eventually, successful training will be achieved with patience and consistency. https://karenpryoracademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/ctp-october-2017-claudia-barbuto-animal-training-classes-clicker-training-karen-pryor-featured.jpg
Potty training is a behavior your dog can learn quickly, provided that you supervise your puppy, stick to a schedule and reward successes. Supervision requires that you pay close attention to your dog at all times so that you can pick up on pre-potty signals. Use a properly sized crate for those times when you can’t actively supervise your puppy, as well as for nap time and bedtime. Scheduling your puppy’s life will help make his days pleasantly predictable and will enable you to better track his potty habits. Schedule his meals, nap times, play times and, of course, his trips outside. Finally, make sure to accompany your puppy outside for every potty trip and give him a small treat immediately after he finishes his elimination. If you wait until you get back in the house, your puppy won’t make the connection between his potty and the treat. Find more tips, check out "How to Potty Train Your Dog." https://thefundamentaldog.com/dogtraining/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/500x500_private_puppy_training_woodlands_texas-min.jpg
Whenever you’re training your dog, it’s important to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone’s on the same page. If you are telling your dog “off” when he jumps on the couch and someone else is saying “down,” while someone else is letting him hang out up there, how on earth is he ever going to learn what you want? Consistency will be the key to your success.
Hello & Welcome! ALL DOGS, ALL AGES, ALL BREEDS, ALL BEHAVIOR. Regardless of your dog's age, breed, undesired behavior situations you're experiencing, and your goals, if YOU are ready to learn, YES, I can help you. 👍🐾 Classes fill from our waiting list (wait time ranges 3- 9 mos), all 2019 Classes are full, next openings are Jan 2020. TO ADD YOUR NAME TO THE WAITING LIST click below, you'll then receive a welcome email with information on LIFE WITH DOGS - BEGINNER class. Look forward to working with you & your dog and Bringing out Your BEST Behavior!
Remember that training is an ongoing process. You will never be completely finished. It is important to keep working on obedience training throughout the life of your dog. People who learn a language at a young age but stop speaking that language may forget much of it as they grow older. The same goes for your dog: use it or lose it. Running through even the most basic tricks and commands will help them stay fresh in your dog's mind. Plus, it's a great way to spend time with your dog.
Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate. https://www.cia.gov/news-information/featured-story-archive/2015-featured-story-archive/images/cia-k9-tips/K9_Training6.jpg/image.jpg
Acquire a crate or “den.” Just like people, puppies don’t want to eliminate near the areas they eat and sleep. Crate training your puppy is a great way to help the puppy learn bladder control.[7] The crate also gives security. When you're around, leave the crate door open for going in and out as needed. Leave toys, treats, and comfy bedding inside. The crate should be a happy place, not a place for punishment.
Understand how your puppy views the environment. Puppies don’t have an inherent understanding of what humans consider right and wrong. They can learn many behaviors, though. A puppy doesn’t understand that it is “bad” behavior to urinate on your carpet. To your puppy, the carpet is an acceptable surface, just like the grass outside. You must teach the puppy the better choice.
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