Hello & Welcome! ALL DOGS, ALL AGES, ALL BREEDS, ALL BEHAVIOR. Regardless of your dog's age, breed, undesired behavior situations you're experiencing, and your goals, if YOU are ready to learn, YES, I can help you. 👍🐾 Classes fill from our waiting list (wait time ranges 3- 9 mos), all 2019 Classes are full, next openings are Jan 2020. TO ADD YOUR NAME TO THE WAITING LIST click below, you'll then receive a welcome email with information on LIFE WITH DOGS - BEGINNER class. Look forward to working with you & your dog and Bringing out Your BEST Behavior!
Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!

The Labrador retriever takes the cake as the most popular dog in the U.S. — and for good reason. The breed is easy to train, whether you want one as a family dog or working dog. The AKC reports Labs socialize well with humans and with other dogs. But you shouldn’t “confuse his laid-back personality for low energy. The Labrador retriever is extremely active — he’s never met a backyard he didn’t like.” According to the Labrador Retriever Club, these dogs are “eager to please and non-aggressive toward man or animal.”
Keep your training sessions short, consistent and always have fun. The key to shaping your puppy's behavior is to start out with very easy commands, continue to build on these successes and apply heaps of repetition. Base your puppy training sessions around trust and mutual respect rather than old school methods based on punishment, avoidance and harsh corrections. In this environment you will find that your puppy loves his training sessions and his confidence will grow with each and every session.
Often, the sit command will be one of the easiest for your dog to learn first. Next, you can train your dog to lie down. At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay. In addition, your dog should be trained to come when called as soon as possible. This is one of the most important fundamental commands. Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands.

Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate.
There are a lot of different ways to train your dog. You may choose to sign up for a dog training class, hire a professional dog trainer for private lessons, or even send your dog to board with a trainer. However, plenty of people successfully train their dogs on their own. It's a great way to save money on training costs, and a wonderful way to bond with your dog.

This package is for those who really want their dog to be rock-stars! This includes 8 lessons for $850.00. You save $75.00 by paying for the Basic Obedience Package and 4 Advanced lessons up-front! The e-collar we use has a two-year warranty, it is completely waterproof, and it has a range of 3/4 mile (1200 yards)! This will be ready at your first lesson along with the 20-foot leash!
Located in Van Buren, Arkansas, SMART DOGS is the creation of owner Mary A. Gilbreth, Ph.D., Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) and Certified Holistic Life & Stress Management Coach (CHLC).  Committed to education & excellence, Mary was the first trainer in the state of Arkansas to earn a CPDT and  has continued to bring numerous other firsts to the people & dogs of AR.  In addition to sharing her own knowledge & skills, Mary has hosted several  internationally known trainers  – Kathy Cascade (TTouch), Theresa McKeon (TAGteach International), and Kay Laurence (Learning About Dogs).  A Specialist in preventing & modifying aggressive and fearful behavior, Mary is well-versed in canine and human behavior, relationships, training, wellness & nutrition.  Mary is an avid clicker and positive reinforcement trainer and teaches a wide range of topics, activities & Dog Sports to her students  and also the Plumwood Posse – her dogs and cat.  To date, Mary & her dogs hold titles in Agility, Freestyle Tricks, Obedience, Rally & Triebball and certifications in Canine Good Citizen and Therapy Dog. Through education, behavior change and a whole lot of fun, Mary promotes better behavior at *both* ends of the leash.
Positive-reinforcement is the methodology suggested by humane organizations, veterinary associations and dog trainers alike. This type of training focuses on rewarding desired behaviors using something that the dog values (typically treats), removing the reward for undesired behaviors and not using physical punishment or fear to bring about behavioral change.
Do you or someone in your family have Diabetes? This is our 13 private lesson training program which will give you all of the tools, knowledge, and training necessary in order to make your personal dog a diabetic alert dog.(service dog). This program will take your dog from knowing nothing about scent detection, to targeting on your blood sugar, and alerting you before you reach a dangerous level. If you are interested in this program, click here: http://diabeticdogvirginia.com/
This article was co-authored by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS. Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS is a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice. She graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1987 with a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. She has worked at the same animal clinic in her hometown for over 20 years.
There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion. http://www.tcotc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/home-bkg1.jpg
Often, the sit command will be one of the easiest for your dog to learn first. Next, you can train your dog to lie down. At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay. In addition, your dog should be trained to come when called as soon as possible. This is one of the most important fundamental commands. Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands.
It typically takes 4-6 months for a puppy to be fully house trained, but some puppies may take up to a year. Size can be a predictor. For instance, smaller breeds have smaller bladders and higher metabolisms and require more frequent trips outside. Your puppy's previous living conditions are another predictor. You may find that you need to help your puppy break old habits in order to establish more desirable ones. https://images.ctfassets.net/2t8dhn7s97w9/5g32AdRSc3TCRj44EmyTAr/ef05fa282c5ebd370bec89ccf5aa0a74/Zuzu_Training.png
Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.
Changing behavior takes time. You need to have realistic expectations about changing your dog’s behavior as well as how long it will take to change behaviors that you don’t like. Often behaviors which are “normal” doggie behaviors will take the most time such as barking, digging and jumping. You also need to consider how long your dog has rehearsed the behavior. For example, if you didn’t mind that your dog jumped up on people to say hi for the last seven years and now you decide that you don’t want him to do that anymore, that behavior will take a much longer time to undo than if you had addressed it when he was a pup. Remember it’s never too late to change the behavior some will just take longer than others.

Two weeks ago, before meeting with Don, walking Pippi was a bit of a chore, she pulled me along and when an exciting animal or something peaked her attention she worked hard to chase after. But i cannot tell a lie, it was one lesson with Don and walking instantly got easier and more enjoyable. And yesterday Pippi walked without pulling once; when...

This will give your new pup a good foundation for basic obedience! Also, during the training, Off Leash K9 can teach you how to house train your dog in order for it to quit having accidents in the house! Additionally, Off Leash K9 will train it to let you know when it has to go outside! During these sessions, Off Leash K9 also answer any questions you have regarding your new pup or its’ training.
Don't be surprised by “reversions." Your puppy may revert to eliminating inside again after you thought he was trained. This can happen for a number of reasons, such as sexual maturity, change of routine, curiosity overwhelming the need to go at the usual time, etc. Resume the consistent routine you used to housebreak your puppy. He will quickly start obeying the routine again.[19] https://www.labradortraininghq.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/when-to-start-training-a-puppy-1.jpg
Once you’ve taken some classes and your dog has mastered the necessary skills, you might decide to compete. There are three main levels of progression in competition: Novice, Open and Utility; with other steps in between to help build on the required skills. Find an event near you and then submit an official AKC entry form to the trial secretary or superintendent in charge of accepting the entries for the trial.
There are a lot of different ways to train your dog. You may choose to sign up for a dog training class, hire a professional dog trainer for private lessons, or even send your dog to board with a trainer. However, plenty of people successfully train their dogs on their own. It's a great way to save money on training costs, and a wonderful way to bond with your dog.
×