If you’re an experienced dog owner and simply want a dog who will take to training well, you might want to consider a border collie. The border collie has tons of energy but wants to please you. The AKC advises, “The uncanny intelligence, athleticism, and trainability of border collies have a perfect outlet in agility work.” Translation? This workaholic dog will never be a couch potato. So you’ll need to expend some of your own energy keeping him busy.
The Brussels griffon consistently ranks as one of the easiest dogs to train. As the AKC notes, they are “social, friendly, and easily trained and will usually get along well with other family pets and well-behaved children.” Just bear in mind they’re one of the more high-maintenance dog breeds because they prefer to stay close to their owners and don’t like being left alone.
New puppy owners often make the mistake of endlessly worrying about finding the right accessories, puppy treats, or bed. They spend little or no time thinking about how or what they will teach their new puppy. Yes, a puppy needs nutritious food and a safe, warm place to live, but another equally powerful and important biological necessity is the need for a strong pack leader.
Clicker training is a wonderful way to utilize the power of positive reinforcement. The clicker, a small device that makes a precise noise, effectively marks when your dog has performed the correct action that will pay off with a food reward. Once your dog has mastered the behavior, you can wean them off of the clicker and put it away until it’s time to teach something new. Clicker training can be used for everything from teaching the basics like “sit,” “down” and “come” to more complex behavioral modification for challenges like leash aggression. https://www.allthingsdogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Puppy-Training-Tips.jpg
Potty training is a behavior your dog can learn quickly, provided that you supervise your puppy, stick to a schedule and reward successes. Supervision requires that you pay close attention to your dog at all times so that you can pick up on pre-potty signals. Use a properly sized crate for those times when you can’t actively supervise your puppy, as well as for nap time and bedtime. Scheduling your puppy’s life will help make his days pleasantly predictable and will enable you to better track his potty habits. Schedule his meals, nap times, play times and, of course, his trips outside. Finally, make sure to accompany your puppy outside for every potty trip and give him a small treat immediately after he finishes his elimination. If you wait until you get back in the house, your puppy won’t make the connection between his potty and the treat. Find more tips, check out "How to Potty Train Your Dog."
This includes the Off-Leash K9 Training E-Collar which all of our dogs are trained on, a 20 foot leash, and includes all FOUR lessons for $575.00. So you save $50.00 by paying for everything up-front! The e-collar we use has a two-year warranty, it is completely waterproof, and it has a range of 3/4 mile (1200 yards)! This will be brought to your first lesson along with the 20-foot leash! By the end of this package, your dog will be able to be outside, off-leash, with distractions listening on command. https://www.dhresource.com/0x0s/f2-albu-g8-M00-94-79-rBVaV1znsK2AF0b0AAGEqT6J_wU688.jpg/pet-dog-trainer-portable-dog-button-clicker.jpg
Before you begin dog obedience training, choose the best method for you and your dog. Training styles vary, but most trainers agree that dogs respond best to positive reinforcement, such as praise or treats. One common training variation, known as clicker training, includes the use of conditioned reinforcer. There are plenty of dog training books and websites where you can learn about training techniques and determine which best suits you and your dog. When planning out your training methods, don't forget about socialization.

Develop a potty schedule. The most important thing of all when house training a puppy (or dog) is consistency. If you are consistent, and do the same thing and expect the same action every single time, your puppy will catch on very quickly. On the other hand, changing your actions and expectations will confuse your puppy. Create a predictable and consistent routine for your puppy.[4] Take your puppy out:[11]
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