Scolding a puppy for soiling your rug, especially after the fact, isn’t going to do anything except make her think you’re a nut. Likewise, some old methods of punishment, like rubbing a dog’s nose in her poop, are so bizarre that it’s hard to imagine how they came to be and if they ever worked for anyone. On the other hand, praising a puppy for doing the right thing works best for everything you will do in your life together. Make her think that she is a little canine Einstein every time she performs this simple, natural act. Be effusive in your praise—cheer, clap, throw cookies. Let her know that no other accomplishment, ever—not going to the moon, not splitting the atom, not inventing coffee—has been as important as this pee. Reward your pup with one of his favorite Purina® Pro Plan® treats. Make sure they’re nice and small, easy for your puppy to digest.
You may also notice common behavior problems in your dog such as jumping up, barking, or even aggression. The best way to correct any misbehavior is to interrupt it. Shift your dog's attention to something positive. Try running through cues that your dog has mastered followed by rewards. Keep your demeanor cool and confident, and be clear about what you mean.
Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate.
Clicker training is a wonderful way to utilize the power of positive reinforcement. The clicker, a small device that makes a precise noise, effectively marks when your dog has performed the correct action that will pay off with a food reward. Once your dog has mastered the behavior, you can wean them off of the clicker and put it away until it’s time to teach something new. Clicker training can be used for everything from teaching the basics like “sit,” “down” and “come” to more complex behavioral modification for challenges like leash aggression.
Take up the puppy's water early in the evening. Roughly 2.5 hours before bedtime, take up your puppy’s water dish.[15] This will help ensure that puppy’s last trip out just before bed is good enough to last overnight. Most puppies can sleep for approximately seven hours without having to eliminate, so if you take the water dish up well before bed, then your puppy should have fewer accidents overnight.[16]
Your dog must finish our Basic Obedience Package before we will teach them advanced lessons! We offer numerous advanced lessons! Some are: extended distance obedience (your dog will be sitting/downing on command from 50+ yards away from you), heel command (they come running, go around you and sit down right beside your left leg), watch command (stare at you until you release them), through command (go in between your legs and sit down), stand command (they will assume a standing position on command), front command (they will come running and sit directly in front of you no matter where they are), focused heeling (will stare at you the entire time they heel), touch command (they will run up and stand up against anything you point to), and many more!
New puppy owners often make the mistake of endlessly worrying about finding the right accessories, puppy treats, or bed. They spend little or no time thinking about how or what they will teach their new puppy. Yes, a puppy needs nutritious food and a safe, warm place to live, but another equally powerful and important biological necessity is the need for a strong pack leader. https://i.ytimg.com/vi/mh99rwZG47U/maxresdefault.jpg
Owning a dog comes with a lot of responsibility. Dogs need a safe environment and a nutritious diet. They need veterinary care. Plus, they need exercise, attention, and plenty of training. It’s no wonder that in addition to searching for a dog who’s easy to own, many people want a dog who will easily learn new tricks (or learn to relieve himself outside).
Positive reinforcement is the key to success. A common mistake is to punish your dog during training or become angry. This will only cause confusion. You can try to hold your dog's attention with treats and enthusiasm, but know that it is time to end a session when your dog becomes bored or tired. Try to end sessions on a positive note. Eventually, successful training will be achieved with patience and consistency. https://karenpryoracademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/ctp-october-2017-claudia-barbuto-animal-training-classes-clicker-training-karen-pryor-featured.jpg
Whenever you’re training your dog, it’s important to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone’s on the same page. If you are telling your dog “off” when he jumps on the couch and someone else is saying “down,” while someone else is letting him hang out up there, how on earth is he ever going to learn what you want? Consistency will be the key to your success.
Unless you plan to keep your dog outdoors--and few of us do because it's not recommended--you'll need to teach your dog where to eliminate. Therefore, house training (also called housebreaking or potty training) is one of the first things you need to work on with your dog. Crate training can be a very helpful part of the training process. This includes house training as well as many other areas of training: http://www.pedigreedatabase.com/uploads/oli/images/Dog_Training_91335.jpg
Unless you plan to keep your dog outdoors--and few of us do because it's not recommended--you'll need to teach your dog where to eliminate. Therefore, house training (also called housebreaking or potty training) is one of the first things you need to work on with your dog. Crate training can be a very helpful part of the training process. This includes house training as well as many other areas of training:
One of the cornerstones of good health for your puppy is regular veterinary care. It is crucial that your puppy maintains a nutritional diet and exercise routine to stay healthy and balanced. Plus, your vet can advise on heartworm, and flea and tick preventative care. While a lot goes into keeping your puppy in good health, it all begins with the first visit to the vet.
You may also notice common behavior problems in your dog such as jumping up, barking, or even aggression. The best way to correct any misbehavior is to interrupt it. Shift your dog's attention to something positive. Try running through cues that your dog has mastered followed by rewards. Keep your demeanor cool and confident, and be clear about what you mean. https://www.kennelwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Puppy-Training-1000xx750-495x400.jpg
Your dog must finish our Basic Obedience Package before we will teach them advanced lessons! We offer numerous advanced lessons! Some are: extended distance obedience (your dog will be sitting/downing on command from 50+ yards away from you), heel command (they come running, go around you and sit down right beside your left leg), watch command (stare at you until you release them), through command (go in between your legs and sit down), stand command (they will assume a standing position on command), front command (they will come running and sit directly in front of you no matter where they are), focused heeling (will stare at you the entire time they heel), touch command (they will run up and stand up against anything you point to), and many more!
You may also notice common behavior problems in your dog such as jumping up, barking, or even aggression. The best way to correct any misbehavior is to interrupt it. Shift your dog's attention to something positive. Try running through cues that your dog has mastered followed by rewards. Keep your demeanor cool and confident, and be clear about what you mean.
Don't be surprised by “reversions." Your puppy may revert to eliminating inside again after you thought he was trained. This can happen for a number of reasons, such as sexual maturity, change of routine, curiosity overwhelming the need to go at the usual time, etc. Resume the consistent routine you used to housebreak your puppy. He will quickly start obeying the routine again.[19]

Scolding a puppy for soiling your rug, especially after the fact, isn’t going to do anything except make her think you’re a nut. Likewise, some old methods of punishment, like rubbing a dog’s nose in her poop, are so bizarre that it’s hard to imagine how they came to be and if they ever worked for anyone. On the other hand, praising a puppy for doing the right thing works best for everything you will do in your life together. Make her think that she is a little canine Einstein every time she performs this simple, natural act. Be effusive in your praise—cheer, clap, throw cookies. Let her know that no other accomplishment, ever—not going to the moon, not splitting the atom, not inventing coffee—has been as important as this pee. Reward your pup with one of his favorite Purina® Pro Plan® treats. Make sure they’re nice and small, easy for your puppy to digest. https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5975726a5016e132ff0521a9/1505326184418-OTUW2AGZTXKPDY75I9WJ/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kDrQ9tfdcvPUv7NgXGP4R2R7gQa3H78H3Y0txjaiv_0fDoOvxcdMmMKkDsyUqMSsMWxHk725yiiHCCLfrh8O1z4YTzHvnKhyp6Da-NYroOW3ZGjoBKy3azqku80C789l0gmXcXvEVFTLbYX9CdVcGe4zwrosjp5YtnrvbmlM1LFKb7wNXE8lRZ0Z8l5PIsW3Vw/Stephanie+Bennett+Dog+Puppy+Training+%7C+Behavior+Modification+Potty+Training+%7C+Houston+TX_FC_7619+resized.jpg?format

The Australian shepherd can learn anything you can teach him. But you need to keep him busy and entertained. In fact, you’ll probably need to continually devise new games and challenges for this highly intelligent dog. As the American Kennel Club explains, this breed’s “strong work drive can make Aussies more dog than a sedentary pet owner might bargain for. Aussies are remarkably intelligent, quite capable of outthinking an unsuspecting novice owner.”

When she feels an urge, the puppy will usually let you know by whining and scratching. That’s her signal that she has to go and wants out of her little den. Now! Don’t delay because if you let your pup lose control in her crate, she’ll get the idea that it’s OK to mess up her living space. Then she’ll think nothing of leaving little packages around where you live, too.
Clean up any accidents quickly and thoroughly. Hardwood and tile floors should be wiped cleaned and sprayed with a disinfectant. Carpets need to be cleaned with a carpet cleaner. This is probably the most important step because dogs have such a great sense of smell. If they can still smell the urine or feces, they will continue to eliminate in the same spot.[18] This is also why the dog should remain on leash inside the house for many months before allowing free range of the whole house. https://i.pinimg.com/originals/f7/68/0f/f7680ffd09652c81ea4ce96bea48a211.jpg
Dr. Burch says the use of puppy pads and paper training can be “tricky because you’re reinforcing two different options for the puppy.” In an ideal situation, pups would learn to hold it indoors and only eliminate at specific spots outdoors. But some cases may require a bit of creative thought, such as a person who has a job that makes it impossible to get home several times a day, or for a tiny dog living where the winters are brutal. Puppy pads give a dog the option of relieving herself in an approved spot at home. After the dog matures, the owner can then work on having the dog do her business outdoors all the time. https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-mruknktb/images/stencil/1280x1280/products/1351/6150/DTB1276_c__67065.1471902137.jpg?c
Positive-reinforcement is the methodology suggested by humane organizations, veterinary associations and dog trainers alike. This type of training focuses on rewarding desired behaviors using something that the dog values (typically treats), removing the reward for undesired behaviors and not using physical punishment or fear to bring about behavioral change.
Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.
Located in Van Buren, Arkansas, SMART DOGS is the creation of owner Mary A. Gilbreth, Ph.D., Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) and Certified Holistic Life & Stress Management Coach (CHLC).  Committed to education & excellence, Mary was the first trainer in the state of Arkansas to earn a CPDT and  has continued to bring numerous other firsts to the people & dogs of AR.  In addition to sharing her own knowledge & skills, Mary has hosted several  internationally known trainers  – Kathy Cascade (TTouch), Theresa McKeon (TAGteach International), and Kay Laurence (Learning About Dogs).  A Specialist in preventing & modifying aggressive and fearful behavior, Mary is well-versed in canine and human behavior, relationships, training, wellness & nutrition.  Mary is an avid clicker and positive reinforcement trainer and teaches a wide range of topics, activities & Dog Sports to her students  and also the Plumwood Posse – her dogs and cat.  To date, Mary & her dogs hold titles in Agility, Freestyle Tricks, Obedience, Rally & Triebball and certifications in Canine Good Citizen and Therapy Dog. Through education, behavior change and a whole lot of fun, Mary promotes better behavior at *both* ends of the leash.
Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate. https://idahohumanesociety.org/content/uploads/2019/02/Dog-Training2-e1549400841984.jpg
If you’re an experienced dog owner and simply want a dog who will take to training well, you might want to consider a border collie. The border collie has tons of energy but wants to please you. The AKC advises, “The uncanny intelligence, athleticism, and trainability of border collies have a perfect outlet in agility work.” Translation? This workaholic dog will never be a couch potato. So you’ll need to expend some of your own energy keeping him busy. https://www.k9ofmine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/best-free-online-dog-training-videos-e1423165813419-1150x700.jpg
Effective dog training does not require many items, but there are a few basic supplies that will help make the process more convenient and effective. Choose a dog collar or harness that is suitable and comfortable for your dog. Then decide which dog leash is best for training. A retractable leash is not appropriate for dog training. You will also need dog training treats that your dog enjoys and are easy to eat quickly so the reward is more immediate. There are plenty of great treats available at pet stores or you can also use something you make at home, like small pieces of plain cooked chicken or turkey.
Understand how your puppy views the environment. Puppies don’t have an inherent understanding of what humans consider right and wrong. They can learn many behaviors, though. A puppy doesn’t understand that it is “bad” behavior to urinate on your carpet. To your puppy, the carpet is an acceptable surface, just like the grass outside. You must teach the puppy the better choice.
Choose a designated area for your puppy to "go" before bringing him home. This spot might be somewhere in the backyard, next to a structure that provides shelter from wind, or some other suitable place in the garden. Wherever it is, have a firm commitment to it before getting the puppy. You don't want to create inconsistent messages by shifting his toilet around the yard while you make up your mind.[10]
Success is usually attained in small steps. Training sessions with your dog should last 10 to 15 minutes, two to three times per day. This is especially true for puppies because of their very short attention spans. Longer sessions can cause an adult dog to become bored. Start by teaching basic commands. Try to stick with one action per training session so your dog does not get confused.
Size the crate appropriately. Size the crate so the puppy can stand up, turn around, and lie down. It should not be so big that the puppy can eliminate in one corner and sleep in another. The idea is to use the natural instinct to avoid sleeping in your own mess to help with the housebreaking process. If you have a large breed puppy, there are crates designed to “grow” with your puppy, so you don’t have to waste money buying bigger sizes as they age. If you don’t have a crate, you can use a section of your bathroom partitioned with a baby gate.[9]

Take up the puppy's water early in the evening. Roughly 2.5 hours before bedtime, take up your puppy’s water dish.[15] This will help ensure that puppy’s last trip out just before bed is good enough to last overnight. Most puppies can sleep for approximately seven hours without having to eliminate, so if you take the water dish up well before bed, then your puppy should have fewer accidents overnight.[16] http://specialtydogtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/classical-conditioning.jpg
It typically takes 4-6 months for a puppy to be fully house trained, but some puppies may take up to a year. Size can be a predictor. For instance, smaller breeds have smaller bladders and higher metabolisms and require more frequent trips outside. Your puppy's previous living conditions are another predictor. You may find that you need to help your puppy break old habits in order to establish more desirable ones.
Keep your training sessions short, consistent and always have fun. The key to shaping your puppy's behavior is to start out with very easy commands, continue to build on these successes and apply heaps of repetition. Base your puppy training sessions around trust and mutual respect rather than old school methods based on punishment, avoidance and harsh corrections. In this environment you will find that your puppy loves his training sessions and his confidence will grow with each and every session. https://esadoctors.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/how-to-train-my-dog-to-be-an-esa-e1489696596890.jpg
Have somebody look after your puppy. If you go on trips, have somebody look after the puppy. If you live with your family or friends, have them look after him. If your whole family has gone, have somebody who knows about puppies come down and babysit. Tell him or her your schedule, where they sleep, what to feed them, what not to feed them, etc. You can also use a kennel—a place where people look after dogs/puppies while you are gone.

Often, the sit command will be one of the easiest for your dog to learn first. Next, you can train your dog to lie down. At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay. In addition, your dog should be trained to come when called as soon as possible. This is one of the most important fundamental commands. Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands.
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