New puppy owners often make the mistake of endlessly worrying about finding the right accessories, puppy treats, or bed. They spend little or no time thinking about how or what they will teach their new puppy. Yes, a puppy needs nutritious food and a safe, warm place to live, but another equally powerful and important biological necessity is the need for a strong pack leader.
Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate. http://findbestwaystobecome.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/how-to-train-your-pet-5.jpg
This 2-week program is a program which focuses on practical, everyday obedience that is completed with a high level of precision, outside, off-leash, with distractions! This program provides a little bit of everything, including manners and socialization (dogs and people). All behaviors are taught with high-level distraction proofing. This program offers the following: https://wagsandwiggles.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Untitled-design.jpg

Size the crate appropriately. Size the crate so the puppy can stand up, turn around, and lie down. It should not be so big that the puppy can eliminate in one corner and sleep in another. The idea is to use the natural instinct to avoid sleeping in your own mess to help with the housebreaking process. If you have a large breed puppy, there are crates designed to “grow” with your puppy, so you don’t have to waste money buying bigger sizes as they age. If you don’t have a crate, you can use a section of your bathroom partitioned with a baby gate.[9] https://www.doghealth.com/images/clicker_training_dog_fetch.jpg
The Australian shepherd can learn anything you can teach him. But you need to keep him busy and entertained. In fact, you’ll probably need to continually devise new games and challenges for this highly intelligent dog. As the American Kennel Club explains, this breed’s “strong work drive can make Aussies more dog than a sedentary pet owner might bargain for. Aussies are remarkably intelligent, quite capable of outthinking an unsuspecting novice owner.”
I don't teach or recommend so-called "purely positive" methods that allow misbehaving pups to continue misbehaving, instead of teaching them which behaviors are and are not allowed. "Purely positive" is fine for teaching tricks and high-level competition exercises, but NOT for teaching the solid good behaviors that all family dogs need to know, and NOT for stopping behavior problems such as barking, jumping, chewing, nipping, chasing, etc.
Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.
Bringing a young pup into our lives is a big responsibility and commitment to fulfill. Our puppies have a long list of requirements and deadlines that must be met for their well-being and longevity. Tasks like puppy house training, crate training, puppy socialization, leash training and basic obedience need to be addressed right from the very start.
Have somebody look after your puppy. If you go on trips, have somebody look after the puppy. If you live with your family or friends, have them look after him. If your whole family has gone, have somebody who knows about puppies come down and babysit. Tell him or her your schedule, where they sleep, what to feed them, what not to feed them, etc. You can also use a kennel—a place where people look after dogs/puppies while you are gone. https://nwkare.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Zeko_509x610_Training2.jpg

Watch for signs. Your puppy may start to understand that he should eliminate outside before he understands how to let you know he needs to go. Watch for telltale signs that a puppy has a full bladder. Look for: barking or scratching at the door through which you take your puppy out, squatting, restlessness, and sniffing around or circling.[12] If you observe one of these behaviors, especially when you haven’t taken your puppy out recently, then it’s probably time for him to go.
Located in Van Buren, Arkansas, SMART DOGS is the creation of owner Mary A. Gilbreth, Ph.D., Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) and Certified Holistic Life & Stress Management Coach (CHLC).  Committed to education & excellence, Mary was the first trainer in the state of Arkansas to earn a CPDT and  has continued to bring numerous other firsts to the people & dogs of AR.  In addition to sharing her own knowledge & skills, Mary has hosted several  internationally known trainers  – Kathy Cascade (TTouch), Theresa McKeon (TAGteach International), and Kay Laurence (Learning About Dogs).  A Specialist in preventing & modifying aggressive and fearful behavior, Mary is well-versed in canine and human behavior, relationships, training, wellness & nutrition.  Mary is an avid clicker and positive reinforcement trainer and teaches a wide range of topics, activities & Dog Sports to her students  and also the Plumwood Posse – her dogs and cat.  To date, Mary & her dogs hold titles in Agility, Freestyle Tricks, Obedience, Rally & Triebball and certifications in Canine Good Citizen and Therapy Dog. Through education, behavior change and a whole lot of fun, Mary promotes better behavior at *both* ends of the leash.
The Rottweiler takes easily to training, but he definitely needs a job to keep him happy. According to the AKC, this dog’s “intelligence, endurance and willingness to work make him suitable as a police dog, herder, service dog, therapy dog, obedience competitor and devoted companion.” You’ll need to train him on basic obedience commands, as well as social skills. And you’ll also have to harness his natural territorial instincts. As the AKC puts it, “He has to know that you’re in charge, even if he is twice your size.”
That can vary considerably, says Dr. Burch. There are many factors to consider, such as age, learning history, and your methods and consistency. An 8-week-old puppy is very different developmentally than a 5-month-old puppy. Some puppies have perfect manners after just a few days. Others can take months, especially if the dog has had a less than ideal situation before coming to you. With patience and persistence, though, most dogs can learn.
Your young puppy is totally reliant and dependent on you to help him habituate and fit into our human, domesticated world. Your guidance and leadership will determine what path his life takes and what type of dog he will become. During puppyhood you play the lead role and are responsible for shaping the character, temperament and behavior habits that your dog will carry throughout his life. Your puppy's future is in your capable hands... https://tractive.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/dog-843800_1920-1024x683.jpg
Let your new dog gradually earn freedom throughout your home. A common error that many pet parents make is giving their new dog too much freedom too soon. This can easily lead to accidents relating to housetraining and destructive chewing. So, close off doors to unoccupied rooms and use baby gates to section off parts of the house, if necessary. One of the best ways to minimize incidents is to keep your dog tethered to you in the house and by using a crate or doggie safe area when you can’t actively supervise him.
Your dog must finish our Basic Obedience Package before we will teach them advanced lessons! We offer numerous advanced lessons! Some are: extended distance obedience (your dog will be sitting/downing on command from 50+ yards away from you), heel command (they come running, go around you and sit down right beside your left leg), watch command (stare at you until you release them), through command (go in between your legs and sit down), stand command (they will assume a standing position on command), front command (they will come running and sit directly in front of you no matter where they are), focused heeling (will stare at you the entire time they heel), touch command (they will run up and stand up against anything you point to), and many more! https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/06/12/hsieh_angela_npr_hiddenbrain_clicker1_custom-d27000dbb4b77c0e417db99375b5fb2d072254a8-s800-c85.jpg
There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion. http://www.adventureswithrover.com/uploads/4/5/1/5/45153749/1884289_orig.jpg?318
Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate.
Feed your dog a high-quality diet with appropriate amounts of protein. If your dog spends most of his days lounging in your condo, don’t feed him food with a protein level that is ideal for dogs who herd sheep all day. The money that you will spend on feeding an appropriate quality food will often be money that you save in vet bills later on. I recommend you always check with your veterinarian for the right diet for your dog.
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