Owning a dog comes with a lot of responsibility. Dogs need a safe environment and a nutritious diet. They need veterinary care. Plus, they need exercise, attention, and plenty of training. It’s no wonder that in addition to searching for a dog who’s easy to own, many people want a dog who will easily learn new tricks (or learn to relieve himself outside).
I don't teach or recommend so-called "purely positive" methods that allow misbehaving pups to continue misbehaving, instead of teaching them which behaviors are and are not allowed. "Purely positive" is fine for teaching tricks and high-level competition exercises, but NOT for teaching the solid good behaviors that all family dogs need to know, and NOT for stopping behavior problems such as barking, jumping, chewing, nipping, chasing, etc.
Clicker training is a wonderful way to utilize the power of positive reinforcement. The clicker, a small device that makes a precise noise, effectively marks when your dog has performed the correct action that will pay off with a food reward. Once your dog has mastered the behavior, you can wean them off of the clicker and put it away until it’s time to teach something new. Clicker training can be used for everything from teaching the basics like “sit,” “down” and “come” to more complex behavioral modification for challenges like leash aggression. https://www.allthingsdogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Puppy-Training-Tips.jpg
Changing behavior takes time. You need to have realistic expectations about changing your dog’s behavior as well as how long it will take to change behaviors that you don’t like. Often behaviors which are “normal” doggie behaviors will take the most time such as barking, digging and jumping. You also need to consider how long your dog has rehearsed the behavior. For example, if you didn’t mind that your dog jumped up on people to say hi for the last seven years and now you decide that you don’t want him to do that anymore, that behavior will take a much longer time to undo than if you had addressed it when he was a pup. Remember it’s never too late to change the behavior some will just take longer than others.
Keep your training sessions short, consistent and always have fun. The key to shaping your puppy's behavior is to start out with very easy commands, continue to build on these successes and apply heaps of repetition. Base your puppy training sessions around trust and mutual respect rather than old school methods based on punishment, avoidance and harsh corrections. In this environment you will find that your puppy loves his training sessions and his confidence will grow with each and every session. https://esadoctors.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/how-to-train-my-dog-to-be-an-esa-e1489696596890.jpg
Many people get commercial cleaners at the supermarket. Many of these products contain ammonia. Ammonia smells like urine to your dog. So if your dog urinates on the carpet and you clean with an ammonia product, your dog will come back to that spot and think that a strange dog has gone on the carpet. Your dog will eliminate again on that same spot to cover it.
Examining their stool is the best way for an owner to figure out whether it’s time for a change in diet. If your puppy is consistently producing stools that are bulky, loose, and stinky, it may be time to talk to your vet about switching to a new food. Overfeeding may also provoke a case of diarrhea, which will only make the task of housetraining that much more difficult.
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Develop a potty schedule. The most important thing of all when house training a puppy (or dog) is consistency. If you are consistent, and do the same thing and expect the same action every single time, your puppy will catch on very quickly. On the other hand, changing your actions and expectations will confuse your puppy. Create a predictable and consistent routine for your puppy.[4] Take your puppy out:[11]

We are certified CGC evaluators! This is a certification program that is designed to reward dogs who have good manners at home and in the community. The Canine Good Citizen Program is a two-part program that stresses responsible pet ownership for owners and basic good manners for dogs. All dogs who pass the 10-step CGC test may receive a very nice certificate from the American Kennel Club. You and your dog will practice the CGC exercises: Accepting a friendly stranger, Sitting politely for petting, Appearance & grooming, Out for a walk (loose leash walking), Walking through a crowd, Sit and down on command and Staying in place, Coming when called, Reaction to another dog, Reaction to distraction and Supervised separation. This class is perfect for continuing your dog’s education. You and your dog will work toward creating a better relationship while your dog learns to listen to you consistantly. As you work with your dog to teach the CGC skills, you’ll discover the many benefits and joys of training your dog. Training will enhance the bond between you and your dog. Whether your dog is ready to for the certification, or you want us to help get your dog ready for the certification, contact us! http://www.teamworksdogtraining.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Behavior-Modification-Slide.jpg


New to dog training? This is what you're looking for! A step by step guide on teaching your dog all of the basics. The videos are arranged IN ORDER. These are my current best versions of teaching these essential skills to your dog. There are tons of examples with LOTS of different dogs! None of the puppies or dogs were trained on the topic prior to the video they were featured in I've also included 5 different leash walking videos with 5 very different dogs who behave differently when taking a walk. https://figopetinsurance.com/sites/default/files/styles/blog_detail/public/imagedogswoman-dog-training-husky-puppy-grassblog.jpg?itok
There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion. http://www.tcotc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/home-bkg1.jpg
Our methods focus on creating a positive relationship between you and your dog to improve your dog's behavior and obedience. Our expertise is in understanding how a dog naturally thinks, learns and communicates and then using this to show you how to be your dog’s leader. Once this relationship is established, behavior change is a natural next step. Our techniques work with any age, any breed, any issue. You and your dog get one-on-one attention, an individualized plan to suit your family AND guaranteed support for the life of your dog. https://www.rover.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/training-header-960x540.jpg
Dog training has changed a great deal in the past 25 years, and we now know much more about how dogs learn and the most effective ways to motivate them. While dog training in the past relied on being the “alpha” in the relationship and required equipment like correction collars (or choke collars), behavioral science proves that it’s much more effective to use positive reinforcement training, where training is a team activity with both parties working together to achieve goals.
The idea of using treats to train is often equated with bribery. Truthfully, dogs do what works. If using treats gets them to do what you want, then why not? You can also use the world around you as a reinforcement. Every interaction you have with your dog is a learning opportunity, so when you think about it, you probably don’t use food very often except during active training sessions. So why does your dog continue to hang out? Because you reinforce him with praise, touch, games and walks. Just remember, the behavior should produce the treat; the treat should not produce the behavior.
Start by finding an AKC Club near you that offers training classes. Ask if you can observe a class before committing to make sure it’s the right one for you. Learn more about different types of classes here. To get the most benefit, you must plan on practicing at home as well. But don’t worry: Your at-home sessions don’t have to be very time-consuming and practice sessions should be kept short.
Take up the puppy's water early in the evening. Roughly 2.5 hours before bedtime, take up your puppy’s water dish.[15] This will help ensure that puppy’s last trip out just before bed is good enough to last overnight. Most puppies can sleep for approximately seven hours without having to eliminate, so if you take the water dish up well before bed, then your puppy should have fewer accidents overnight.[16] http://specialtydogtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/classical-conditioning.jpg
At 4-6 months, puppies in this age group can often seem "half" house trained due to their ability to be easily distracted. He's likely to want to explore the world, which means chasing a moth might prevent him from eliminating when you take him to his spot. By now, a puppy of four months can wait about four to five hours before needing to eliminate, while a puppy of six months can go as long as six or seven hours.
Potty training is a behavior your dog can learn quickly, provided that you supervise your puppy, stick to a schedule and reward successes. Supervision requires that you pay close attention to your dog at all times so that you can pick up on pre-potty signals. Use a properly sized crate for those times when you can’t actively supervise your puppy, as well as for nap time and bedtime. Scheduling your puppy’s life will help make his days pleasantly predictable and will enable you to better track his potty habits. Schedule his meals, nap times, play times and, of course, his trips outside. Finally, make sure to accompany your puppy outside for every potty trip and give him a small treat immediately after he finishes his elimination. If you wait until you get back in the house, your puppy won’t make the connection between his potty and the treat. Find more tips, check out "How to Potty Train Your Dog."
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