There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion. http://www.tcotc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/home-bkg1.jpg
The Labrador retriever takes the cake as the most popular dog in the U.S. — and for good reason. The breed is easy to train, whether you want one as a family dog or working dog. The AKC reports Labs socialize well with humans and with other dogs. But you shouldn’t “confuse his laid-back personality for low energy. The Labrador retriever is extremely active — he’s never met a backyard he didn’t like.” According to the Labrador Retriever Club, these dogs are “eager to please and non-aggressive toward man or animal.”
This article was co-authored by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS. Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS is a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice. She graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1987 with a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. She has worked at the same animal clinic in her hometown for over 20 years.
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The Labrador retriever takes the cake as the most popular dog in the U.S. — and for good reason. The breed is easy to train, whether you want one as a family dog or working dog. The AKC reports Labs socialize well with humans and with other dogs. But you shouldn’t “confuse his laid-back personality for low energy. The Labrador retriever is extremely active — he’s never met a backyard he didn’t like.” According to the Labrador Retriever Club, these dogs are “eager to please and non-aggressive toward man or animal.” https://www.mypetconnections.org/uploads/1/0/8/9/108993899/connecting-with-your-pet-workshop-series-june_orig.png
Clicker training is a wonderful way to utilize the power of positive reinforcement. The clicker, a small device that makes a precise noise, effectively marks when your dog has performed the correct action that will pay off with a food reward. Once your dog has mastered the behavior, you can wean them off of the clicker and put it away until it’s time to teach something new. Clicker training can be used for everything from teaching the basics like “sit,” “down” and “come” to more complex behavioral modification for challenges like leash aggression. https://i.pinimg.com/originals/f0/1f/bc/f01fbcd74beec10d7edbda9aec8b1dc4.png
Two weeks ago, before meeting with Don, walking Pippi was a bit of a chore, she pulled me along and when an exciting animal or something peaked her attention she worked hard to chase after. But i cannot tell a lie, it was one lesson with Don and walking instantly got easier and more enjoyable. And yesterday Pippi walked without pulling once; when... https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1027/4289/products/puppy-start-right-2400x2400.jpg?v

If you’re an experienced dog owner and simply want a dog who will take to training well, you might want to consider a border collie. The border collie has tons of energy but wants to please you. The AKC advises, “The uncanny intelligence, athleticism, and trainability of border collies have a perfect outlet in agility work.” Translation? This workaholic dog will never be a couch potato. So you’ll need to expend some of your own energy keeping him busy.
You may also notice common behavior problems in your dog such as jumping up, barking, or even aggression. The best way to correct any misbehavior is to interrupt it. Shift your dog's attention to something positive. Try running through cues that your dog has mastered followed by rewards. Keep your demeanor cool and confident, and be clear about what you mean.
Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.
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