Spread newspapers for your puppy to use. If you don’t have a backyard, a doggie door, or someone who can come let your puppy out while you’re away, you can still use a paper-training method to get a puppy to eliminate in a designated indoor spot. This is just an extra precaution in case the puppy needs to go and cannot wait for you to return home. Place newspaper or a small, accessible box out for the puppy. Since the puppy will want to eliminate in a spot where he can smell previous urine or feces, you can place the rags you used to clean up previous accidents in the box.[20]
Take up the puppy's water early in the evening. Roughly 2.5 hours before bedtime, take up your puppy’s water dish.[15] This will help ensure that puppy’s last trip out just before bed is good enough to last overnight. Most puppies can sleep for approximately seven hours without having to eliminate, so if you take the water dish up well before bed, then your puppy should have fewer accidents overnight.[16] http://specialtydogtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/classical-conditioning.jpg
You can start your puppy off on the right paw by teaching good manners from the moment you bring him home. Every interaction that you have with your puppy is a learning opportunity, and with gentle guidance, you can help him understand important lessons like how to greet new friends without jumping up, how to wait quietly for dinner and what to do with those puppy teeth. 
The Brussels griffon consistently ranks as one of the easiest dogs to train. As the AKC notes, they are “social, friendly, and easily trained and will usually get along well with other family pets and well-behaved children.” Just bear in mind they’re one of the more high-maintenance dog breeds because they prefer to stay close to their owners and don’t like being left alone.
According to the Border Terrier Club of America, the border terrier wants to please you. “This makes it easy to train basic house manners, such as housebreaking, walking on a leash, leaving garbage alone, leaving clothes and kids’ toys alone, not jumping on people or furniture, sitting and staying, and coming when called (barring the presence of a squirrel or rabbit).”
Located in Van Buren, Arkansas, SMART DOGS is the creation of owner Mary A. Gilbreth, Ph.D., Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) and Certified Holistic Life & Stress Management Coach (CHLC).  Committed to education & excellence, Mary was the first trainer in the state of Arkansas to earn a CPDT and  has continued to bring numerous other firsts to the people & dogs of AR.  In addition to sharing her own knowledge & skills, Mary has hosted several  internationally known trainers  – Kathy Cascade (TTouch), Theresa McKeon (TAGteach International), and Kay Laurence (Learning About Dogs).  A Specialist in preventing & modifying aggressive and fearful behavior, Mary is well-versed in canine and human behavior, relationships, training, wellness & nutrition.  Mary is an avid clicker and positive reinforcement trainer and teaches a wide range of topics, activities & Dog Sports to her students  and also the Plumwood Posse – her dogs and cat.  To date, Mary & her dogs hold titles in Agility, Freestyle Tricks, Obedience, Rally & Triebball and certifications in Canine Good Citizen and Therapy Dog. Through education, behavior change and a whole lot of fun, Mary promotes better behavior at *both* ends of the leash.

Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate. http://findbestwaystobecome.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/how-to-train-your-pet-5.jpg


You may also notice common behavior problems in your dog such as jumping up, barking, or even aggression. The best way to correct any misbehavior is to interrupt it. Shift your dog's attention to something positive. Try running through cues that your dog has mastered followed by rewards. Keep your demeanor cool and confident, and be clear about what you mean.
Training should be a pleasure for both you and your dog. Granted, there are often challenges as you work towards better manners but if you find yourself becoming frequently frustrated with your dog, it’s time to get help. Frustration is only a few degrees away from anger and you probably won’t be able to make progress trying to train your dog when you’re feeling upset. https://www.servicedogcertifications.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Service-dog-requirements-e1487737521905.png
This could have you running for the piddle pad, backyard, or street a dozen times or more in a 24-hour period. If you work, make some kind of arrangement (bringing your pup to the office or hiring a dog walker) to keep that schedule. The quicker you convey the idea that there is an approved place to potty and that some places are off-limits, the quicker you’ll be able to put this messy chapter behind you.

Finally, it’s okay to admit that you need a cheerleader to support you as your train your dog. A good trainer will help you troubleshoot setbacks, give you a gentle push if you get stuck and most importantly, help you achieve your goals. Having someone hold you accountable is a great way to ensure that you and your dog get all of the training you need!
Our methods focus on creating a positive relationship between you and your dog to improve your dog's behavior and obedience. Our expertise is in understanding how a dog naturally thinks, learns and communicates and then using this to show you how to be your dog’s leader. Once this relationship is established, behavior change is a natural next step. Our techniques work with any age, any breed, any issue. You and your dog get one-on-one attention, an individualized plan to suit your family AND guaranteed support for the life of your dog.

Dog training classes or private sessions can also be an addition to your own training program. The dog trainer can help you improve the program and customize it to your dog's learning style. Try to be as involved as possible when it comes to your dog's training. You and your dog will be a stronger team when you are directly involved in the training process.
The Brussels griffon consistently ranks as one of the easiest dogs to train. As the AKC notes, they are “social, friendly, and easily trained and will usually get along well with other family pets and well-behaved children.” Just bear in mind they’re one of the more high-maintenance dog breeds because they prefer to stay close to their owners and don’t like being left alone.
Watch for signs. Your puppy may start to understand that he should eliminate outside before he understands how to let you know he needs to go. Watch for telltale signs that a puppy has a full bladder. Look for: barking or scratching at the door through which you take your puppy out, squatting, restlessness, and sniffing around or circling.[12] If you observe one of these behaviors, especially when you haven’t taken your puppy out recently, then it’s probably time for him to go.

Size the crate appropriately. Size the crate so the puppy can stand up, turn around, and lie down. It should not be so big that the puppy can eliminate in one corner and sleep in another. The idea is to use the natural instinct to avoid sleeping in your own mess to help with the housebreaking process. If you have a large breed puppy, there are crates designed to “grow” with your puppy, so you don’t have to waste money buying bigger sizes as they age. If you don’t have a crate, you can use a section of your bathroom partitioned with a baby gate.[9]
Help force the correct behavior without scolding or punishment. Whenever you take puppy out at a designated time, if the puppy eliminates within 3-5 minutes, praise them and place them in the pen surrounding the crate giving them more freedom. If they do not eliminate within 3-5 minutes, place the puppy inside the crate and close the door. Leave them crated for 15-20 minutes and stay close by. After the short waiting period, take the puppy outside again, if they eliminate, they get more freedom in the larger area. If they do not, they go back in the crate.
Develop a potty schedule. The most important thing of all when house training a puppy (or dog) is consistency. If you are consistent, and do the same thing and expect the same action every single time, your puppy will catch on very quickly. On the other hand, changing your actions and expectations will confuse your puppy. Create a predictable and consistent routine for your puppy.[4] Take your puppy out:[11]

Watch for signs. Your puppy may start to understand that he should eliminate outside before he understands how to let you know he needs to go. Watch for telltale signs that a puppy has a full bladder. Look for: barking or scratching at the door through which you take your puppy out, squatting, restlessness, and sniffing around or circling.[12] If you observe one of these behaviors, especially when you haven’t taken your puppy out recently, then it’s probably time for him to go.
Dog training has changed a great deal in the past 25 years, and we now know much more about how dogs learn and the most effective ways to motivate them. While dog training in the past relied on being the “alpha” in the relationship and required equipment like correction collars (or choke collars), behavioral science proves that it’s much more effective to use positive reinforcement training, where training is a team activity with both parties working together to achieve goals. https://clickpawsitivedogtraining.com/files/2014/04/ft1.jpg

At 4-6 months, puppies in this age group can often seem "half" house trained due to their ability to be easily distracted. He's likely to want to explore the world, which means chasing a moth might prevent him from eliminating when you take him to his spot. By now, a puppy of four months can wait about four to five hours before needing to eliminate, while a puppy of six months can go as long as six or seven hours.
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